BOB THORPE
1700 WEST WASHINGTON, SUITE H
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85007-2844
CAPITOL PHONE: (602) 926-5219
CAPITOL FAX: (602) 417-3223
TOLL FREE: 1-800-352-8404
bthorpe@azleg.gov
______
DISTRICT 6
COMMITTEES:
GOVERNMENT & HIGHER
EDUCATION,
CHAIRMAN
EDUCATION,
FEDERALISM & STATES’ RIGHTS,
RULES

September 1, 2015

President Barack Obama
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20500

cc: U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, U.S.Attorney Genera
Loretta Lynch

Dear Mr. President:

This letter reiterates the numerous official communications sent to the United States from the State of Arizona
in continued opposition to the creation of the proposed 1.7 million acre GrandCanyon Watershed National
Monument (GCWNM), and any other new or enlarged National Monument within Arizona. The thirty-nine (39)
below listed bipartisan Arizona State House and Senate members are unequivocally opposed to the GCWNM.

Additionally, the GCWNM is opposed by: 25 members of the U.S. House of Representatives including the
majority of Arizona Congressmen, both U.S. Senators McCain and Flake, the Arizona Game and Fish
Department and its Commission, Arizona city and county elected officials, members of the Arizona Havasupai
and Navajo Tribes, and over 60 wildlife, recreational and agricultural organizations. Nearly 81  percent (59.7
million acres) of land within Arizona is already under the control of the United States (see the gray areas in the
BLM map to the left), including National Monuments, National Parks, National Forests, Bureau of Land
Management, military, tribal, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Wilderness restrictions and special land use designations.
The GCWNM will withdraw 1.7 million additional acres from multiple-uses, such as recreation (hiking,
camping, hunting, fishing), agriculture (farming, ranching, grazing), mining and development. Only about 18
percent of the 73 million acres of land within Arizona is in private ownership, and thus paying taxes for public
education and other needed government services. This places Arizona and the other western states at huge
fiscal disadvantages, in comparison to the eastern states that have very small percentages of their land under
the control of the United States.

Executive Summary of the Facts
The following includes many of the reasons why the United States cannot and should not
create the GCWNM:
  • It is a contractual breach by the United States of the terms of Arizona’s Enabling Act, which stipulates
    that a portion of the revenue from the State Trust land be used for public education (the beneficiaries.)
    The existing and newly proposed National Monuments encumber almost 162,000 acres of Arizona
    State Trust land, which violates the terms of Arizona’s Enabling Act and financially punishes Arizona
    public education 4
  • None of the Arizona Legislatures (as required by Article I, Section 8, Paragraph 17 of the U.S.
    Constitution), Governors, or any voter referendum has ever approved the creation of any of the National
    Monuments or National Parks created within Arizona 2
  • It will encumber 1.7 million more acres of land within Arizona (an area larger than the States of
    Delaware and Rhode Island combined), including the unconstitutional seizing of over 62,000 acres of
    additional State Trust land, 7,000 acres of private land, and vast amounts of contractually leased public
    land. The perimeter fence alone will be greater than the distance between Washington D.C and New
    York City, approximately 206 miles long
  • It will lock-up vast natural lumber and mineral resources, including gold, silver, copper, and what is
    believed to be the largest and richest uranium deposits in the world, a resource that has been called
    “the most significant of strategic minerals.” The National Materials and Minerals Policy Research and
    Development Act of 1980, TITLE 30 CHAPTER 28 § 1601 begins by stating “The Congress finds that (1)
    the availability of
  • materials is essential for national security, economic well-being, and industrial production.”
    Encumbering this important resource would be devastating for the United States, especially in light of
    the recent revelation that under Secretary of State Clinton, the Russians have gained control over 20
    percent of the United States Uranium 10
  • GCWNM was not proposed in compliance with FLPMA (Federal Land Policy and Management Act) or
    NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act), and its creation lacks transparency, public involvement and a
    full accounting of all impacts to multi-users including outdoor recreational enthusiasts. It specifically
    harms Arizona’s authority to manage wildlife (including threatened and endangered) and their
    associated habitats 1
  • Use of the Antiquities Act of 1906 3 for the creation of National Monuments within the states is in
    violation of the U.S. Constitution:
  1. Article I, Section 8, Paragraph 17: use of state land by the United States must be for enumerated
    uses and “purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state”. Arizona has never approved
    or has been compensated for the State Trust land encumbered within the National Monuments.
  2. The Fifth Amendment: “No person shall… be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due
    process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation,”
    which has occurred repeatedly to Arizona State Trust, private and contractually leased public
    land 7
  3. Article 4, Section 4: citizens are constitutionally guaranteed a “Republican Form of Government”
    within the states, which is violated whenever an individual enters Federally controlled Arizona
    lands.
  4. The Antiquities Act is unconstitutional because it grants the President with entirely new powers
    that are not enumerated and are not in Pursuance of the Constitution (the Supremacy Clause,
    Article VI, Clause 2.) The U.S. Constitution does not grant Congress with the enumerated power
    or authority to enact these new Executive
  5. powers, which are clearly not in pursuance of the Constitution, but are in fact in direct conflict
    with it (Article I, Section 8, Paragraph 17.) In order for the Act to be considered Constitutional, a
    new amendment is required that would define “National Monuments” and “National Parks” as
    enumerated uses of land within a state by the United States, and would provide the President
    with these new powers claimed within the Act: to seize land within a state for use by the United
    States without the consent of the state legislature and without just compensation.
  • The GCWNM, and the current National Monuments, violate multiple provisions of the Antiquities Act of
    1906 which is used as the instrument for the unlawful seizure of huge amounts of State Trust, private
    and contractually leased public land .
  • It violates the doctrine of the Equality of States: The United States currently controls 59.7 million acres
    (81 percent) of land within Arizona. This includes 3.7 million acres within 22 National Monuments and
    Parks, which have already encumbered almost 100,000 acres of State Trust land, and countless acres
    of private land and contractually leased public land. The United States only pays PILT (Payment in Lieu
    of Taxes) at an annual average of about 59 cents per acre, but unlike all other private landowners, the
    United States does not pay assessed property taxes on any of the 59.7 million acres of land it holds
    within Arizona. This massive inequity in the Federal control of state land does not exist within the
    eastern states, and it dramatically harms our city, county and state government’s ability to fund
    education and basic public services.
  • It again violates the doctrine of the Equality of States: Arizona currently has the largest number of
    National Monuments (22) created with the second largest number of acres 3.7 million.) There are grave
    inequalities between western and eastern states. There are almost 5 times more National Monuments
    in the western states (W=102, E=23), the total number of acres of National Monuments in the western
    states is 879 times larger (W=71,200,000 acres, E=81,000 acres), and the average number of acres
    within each  Arizona’s National Monument in the western states is 189 times larger (W=698,337 acres,
    E=3,523 acres).
  • It will end multiple-use lands within the GCWNM, including access, conservation efforts and wildlife-
    related recreation, wildlife population augmentations, wildlife habitat manipulations and
    enhancements, wildlife water development and maintenance, and hunting and fishing access 1
  • It has huge potentially negative economic impacts: fishing, hunting and recreation generates $1.2
    billion in spending, creating an economic impact of $2.1 billion to the State of Arizona annually,
    supporting more than 18,000 jobs, $699 million in wages, and generating more than $132 million in
    state tax revenue. Arizona’s neighbor Utah reports that with the creation of the Escalante-Grand
    Staircase National Monument, local counties and communities have experienced rural depopulation, a
    negative impact on public schools, and overall economic losses and negative impacts to the cities,
    counties and state.

In conclusion, the State of Arizona implores the United States to end its 109-year unconstitutional practice of
creating National Monuments within Arizona and the other states, that place land use restrictions on additional
acreage within Arizona, and to immediately begin the process of fully returning these lands to the control of
each state. Additionally, the United States needs to immediately begin the process of disposing of its vast land
holdings within Arizona and the other western states, as it has already done in the eastern states.

Most Respectfully,


Arizona State Representative Bob Thorpe,
Legislative District 6

Co-signers of this Letter Include
House Speaker Gowan
Representative Barton
Representative Borelli
Representative Boyer
Representative Campbell
Representative Cobb
Representative Coleman
Representative Fann
Representative Finchem
Representative Gray
Representative Kern
Representative Lawrence
Representative Leach
Representative Livingston
Representative Mesnard
Representative Mitchell
Representative Norgaard
Representative Pratt
Representative Robson
Representative Shope
Representative Stevens
Representative Townsend
Representative Ugenti
Representative Weninger

Senator Allen
Senator Barto
Senator Begay
Senator Burges
Senator Dial
Senator Farnsworth
Senator Griffin
Senator Kavanagh
Senator Lesko
Senator Pierce
Senator Shooter
Senator Smith
Senator Ward
Senator Worsley
Senator Yarbrough

The following information is provided in support of the claims made within this letter, and are referenced by
superscript numerals (see above) to the following numbered items.

1. The Findings of the Arizona Game and Fish Department
The Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) and its Commission are in opposition to the GCWNM, its
special land-use designation, and the resulting impacts on multiple-use lands, including the impacts on
access, conservation efforts and wildlife-related recreation. This proposed Presidential Proclamation lacks
transparency, public involvement and a full accounting of all impacts to multi-users, specifically the Department’
s authority to manage wildlife, associated habitat and the impacts to outdoor recreational enthusiasts.

The AZGFD Commission’s concerns include:
  • The new National Monument has not been proposed in compliance with the Federal Land Policy and
    Management Act or the National Environmental Policy Act.
  • It does not take into consideration traditional uses of the land, which includes recreational opportunities.
  • It may further restrict and preclude motorized access for recreational use, wildlife viewing opportunities
    disabled hunters and anglers, and the retrieval of downed game.
  • It may cause legal ambiguity concerning the ability to properly manage wildlife and wildlife habitat.

An analysis by the AZGFD demonstrates that this new national monument designation can lead to restrictions
on proactive wildlife management, including but not limited to:
  • Wildlife population augmentations
  • Wildlife habitat manipulations and enhancements
  • Wildlife water development and maintenance
  • Hunting and fishing access

2. U.S. Constitutionally: Enumerated Use of State Land by the United States
According to the U.S. Constitution Article I, Section 8, Paragraph 17, the United States has specific enumerated
uses for land within a state that are “purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state.” Much of the 59.7
million acres (81 percent) of Arizona land that is currently under the control of the United States does not serve
a Constitutionally approved enumerated purpose, including:
  • National Monuments
  • National Parks
  • National Forests
  • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Acreage
  • Wilderness Areas
  • Wildlife Refuges
  • National Historic Sites
  • Bureau of Land Management (BLM) holdings

3. The Antiquities Act of 1906
The enumerated powers and restrictions of the United States government are defined within the Constitution,
and the Tenth Amendment states that “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor
prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” The Antiquities Act is
unconstitutional because Congress does not have the power or authority to grant the Executive Branch of the
United States with the power to seize land, a power which is not granted anywhere within the Constitution. In
fact, Article 4, Section 3 suggests that Congress only has the power to dispose of land, not to acquire.

The Antiquities Act is also unconstitutional, because it allows for the creation of ‘National Monuments,’ which
are not defined as constitutionally enumerated uses of state land by the United States. In the past 109-years,
Congress has never bothered to propose an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would fix these
problems. Section 2 of the Antiquities Act states “That the President of the United States is hereby authorized, in
his discretion, to declare by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and
other objects of historic or scientific interest
that are situated upon the lands owned or controlled by the
Government of the United States
to be national monuments, and may reserve as a part thereof parcels of land,
the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to the smallest area compatible with proper care and
management of the objects to be protected
: Provided, That when such objects are situated upon a tract covered
by a bona fide unperfected claim or held in private ownership, the tract, or so much thereof as may be
necessary for the proper care and management of the object, may be relinquished to the Government, and the
Secretary of the Interior is hereby authorized to accept the relinquishment of such tracts in behalf of the
Government of the United States.”

The Act states that those lands that will become National Monuments must be owned or controlled by the
government of the United States, which has typically not been the case in much of the lands that constitute the
National Monuments created within Arizona. Nowhere within the Act does it suggest that the United States has
the authority to seize State Trust land, especially without state legislative approval or just compensation as
required by Article I, Section 8, Paragraph 17.

The Act encourages property owners with a “tract covered by a bona fied unperfected claim or held in private
ownership” to relinquish their property to the United States, which conflicts with the Fifth Amendment that
requires the United States to compensate citizens when it takes property for public use.  

However, the Act does state “the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to the smallest area compatible
with proper care and management of the objects to be protected.” In almost every case, this provision of the Act
has been violated by the United States, where the average size of the National Monuments located within
Arizona is almost 174,000 acres, clearly not confined to the smallest area as called for within the Act, lands that
include Arizona State Trust, private and contractually leased public land.

The United States has not demonstrated a valid justification for the immense 1.7 million acre size of the
proposed GCWNM, or in fact the other 22 National Monuments that were created within Arizona. Where is the
inventory of each specific individual “historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of
historic or scientific interest” to be protected, as called for in the Act? Where is each object located (GPS
coordinates), where are the digital photographs of each object, where is the independent peer-reviewed
scientific documentation and justification / necessity for protecting each object, how many square feet of land
does each object occupy and what is the amount of land (in square feet) that is required for the "proper care
and management of the objects to be protected” as called for within the Act?

4. Arizona Enabling Act of 1910 and Public Education Funding
The creation of National Monuments directly conflicts with Arizona’s Enabling Act, which repeatedly refers to the
use of State Trust land, and in Section 24 states: “the passage of this Act are hereby granted to the said State
for the support of common schools”. If the United States creates another National Monument within Arizona,
almost 162,000 acres of State Trust land will be financially unavailable for use by the beneficiaries outlined in
Arizona’s Enabling Act, including public schools and universities. This is a violation, a breach of the contractual
terms agreed to by Congress and by the State of Arizona within its Enabling Act, which stipulates that the
financial proceeds from the Arizona State Trust land would be used to support public education.

5. National Monuments Located Within Arizona
The twenty-two National Monuments created within Arizona total 3.7 million acres. The addition of the proposed
1.7 million acre GCWNM would increase Arizona’s total National Monument acreage by 146 percent to 5.4
million acres. The total size of National Monuments within Arizona would then exceed each individual size of the
states of Massachusetts, New Jersey, Hawaii, Connecticut, Delaware and Rhode Island, an area 127 times
larger than Washington DC.

6. Negative Economic Impacts of National Monuments
According to the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, fishing and hunting recreation generates $1.2 billion
in spending and creates an economic impact of $2.1 billion to the State of Arizona annually. These activities
support more than 18,000 jobs, provides residents with $699 million in salary and wages and generates more
than $132 million in state tax revenue. Our neighbor Utah reports that with the creation of the Escalante-Grand
Staircase National Monument, local counties and communities have experienced rural depopulation, a
negative impact on public schools, and overall economic losses and negative impacts to the cities, counties
and state.

7. Due Process Under the Law
The seizure of 1.7 million more acres for the GCWNM by Presidential Proclamation is a violation of the State of
Arizona and its private citizen’s constitutionally guaranteed Due Process rights. The Fifth Amendment states
that “No person shall… be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private
property be taken for public use, without just compensation.”

8. Guaranteed Republican Form of Government
The 59.7 million acres of land currently controlled by the United States within Arizona is a violation both of
Arizona state sovereignty and Arizona’s constitutionally guaranteed Republican Form of Government (Article 4,
Section 4). When within those Federally controlled lands, citizens do not have a voice or vote, they do not have
the same liberties that are guaranteed by Arizona outside of those lands, and they have no city, county or state
representation.

9. Doctrine of the Equality of States
Arizona’s Enabling Act of 1910 states “the proposed State of Arizona shall be deemed admitted by Congress
into the Union by virtue of this Act on an equal footing with other States.” The Supreme Court ruled (3 Stat. 489,
492 (1819)) concerning the sovereignty and jurisdiction of the States, that inasmuch as the original States
retained sovereignty and jurisdiction over the navigable waters and the soil beneath them within their
boundaries, retention by the United States of either title to or jurisdiction over common lands in the new States
would bring those States into the Union on less than an equal footing with the original States. (http://law.justia.
com/constitution/us/article-4/22- doctrine-of-equality-of-states.html). The huge 81 percent of land controlled by
the United States places Arizona (and the other western states) on an unequal footing with the original States
and with the eastern states.

10. Arizona Uranium deposits in the proposed GCWNM
On June 24, 2015, the Arizona State Geologist released its new report “Partial database for breccia pipes and
collapse features on the Colorado Plateau, northwestern Arizona” (http://www.azgs.az.gov/news_releases2015.
shtml#jun24) that found concentrations of breccia pipes 10 to 100 times higher than previously known, in two
test study areas. Breccia pipes are the primary targets for uranium and other minerals. The State Geologist
believes that the same density of pipes extends across the entire region, which would make the area, that
includes the GCWNM, one of the largest and richest uranium districts in the world. For the United States,
Uranium has been called “the most significant of strategic minerals.” From a safety standpoint, more Uranium
flows down the Colorado River from natural erosion (60 tons) than is annually mined worldwide.

11. Resolutions, Letters and Opposition to the Grand Canyon Watershed National
Monument Include
  • A February 2015 letter in opposition written to the President by 25 members of the U.S. House of
    Representatives
  • A 2015 Arizona State Legislative Concurrent Memorial #1001
  • A February 2015 Legislative Resolution from the Arizona State House of Representatives
  • A May 2012 Resolution from the Arizona Game and Fish Department Commission
  • A March 2015 Resolution from Jim Unmacht, the President of the Arizona Sportsmen for Wildlife
    Conservation, which includes AZ Deer Association, AZ Outdoor Sports, AZ Big Game Super Raffle, 1.2.3.
    Go…, AZ Antelope Foundation, AZ Desert Bighorn Sheep Society, Outdoor Experience 4 All, Xtreme
    Predator Callers, AZ Houndsmen, AZ Flycasters Club, Coconino Sportsmen, AZ Bowhunters
    Association, South Eastern AZ Sportsmen’s Club, Mohave Sportsman Club, AZ State Chapter of
    National Wild Turkey Federation, AZ Elk Society, AZ Chapter of Safari Club International, AZ BASS
    Nation, The BASS Federation, SRT Outdoors, Anglers United, AZ Council of Trout Unlimited
  • An April 2015 Resolution from Mayor John Moore and the city council of the City of Williams, Arizona
  • An April 2015 Resolution from the Town Council of Fredonia, Arizona
  • A letter to The Honorable Sally Jewell, Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior and to The Honorable
    Tom Vilsack, Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture from Whit Fosburgh, President and CEO of the
    Theodore Roosevelt Conservation partnership
  • A letter to U.S Representatives Grijalva, Kirkpatrick & Gallego from the members of Archery Trade
    Association, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Boone and Crockett Club, Camp Fire Club of
    America, Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, Council to Advance Hunting and the Shooting
    Sports, Dallas Safari Club, Delta Waterfowl Foundation, Houston Safari Club, Masters of Foxhounds
    Association, Mule Deer Foundation, National Association of Forest Service Retirees, National Rifle
    Association, National Shooting Sports Foundation, National Wild Turkey Federation, North American
    Bear Foundation, Orion: The Hunter’s Institute, Quality Deer Management Association, Rocky Mountain
    Elk Foundation, Ruffed Grouse Society, Safari Club International, Tread Lightly!, Wildlife Management
    Institute, Wild Sheep Foundation, Whitetails Unlimited, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance
  • A March 2015 letter to Congresswoman Ann Kirkpatrick from the Arizona Wildlife Foundation
  • A March 2015 letter to Congresswoman Ann Kirkpatrick from the Apache County Supervisor Barry Weller
  • An April 2015 letter from Steve Clark, Executive Director of the Arizona Elk Society
  • A public statement in August 2015 by Mohave County, the Mohave Cattlemen association and the
    Mohave Sportsmen Club
  • Letters sent to Federal officials by the Arizona Cattlemen’s Association
  • Letters sent to Federal officials by the Arizona Farm Bureau
  • Cattle Growers & Farm Bureau
  • Former Yavapai County Cattle Growers President Andy Groseta
  • The members of the Arizona Rock Products Association
Federal Land Grab Expands
1.7 MILLION acres under attack in the
The Grand Canyon Watershed National Monument!
Facts and Data presented by AZ Representative Bob Thorpe
House Introduces GOSAR-HARDY Amendment  - Includes Coconino County
Click to vote
House Passes Gosar-Hardy Amendment
Blocking Grand Canyon Watershed
National Monument

Jul 8, 2015 Issues: Impact of Excessive Regulations,
Energy and Public Lands
For Immediate Release

Date: July 8, 2015

Contact: Steven D. Smith

Steven.Smith@mail.house.gov

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, U.S. Congressman Paul A.
Gosar, D.D.S. (AZ-04) released the following statement
after the House successfully passed an amendment by a
vote of 222-206 that he spearheaded along with
Congressman Cresent Hardy (NV-04) to prohibit public
land management agencies from carrying out
declarations under the Antiquities Act in counties where
there is significant local opposition:

“Arizona has experienced significant harm from special
land use designations like this in the past. Unfortunately,
certain special interest groups and a few misguided
members of Arizona’s delegation have been pushing for
the President to circumvent Congress and make a
massive 1.7 million acre designation using the Antiquities
Act for the Grand Canyon Watershed. Their intentions are
clear: they want this designation in order to prevent
hunting, mining, timber harvesting and grazing on this
massive swath of land.

“A unilateral declaration of the nearly two million acres in
the Grand Canyon Watershed as a National Monument
would stifle development, kill jobs and erode the extensive
cooperation and success that federal and state agencies
in Arizona have achieved to date. The Antiquities Act has
been significantly abused by this rogue president and
today the House took bold action to prevent future
executive land grabs throughout the country.”

Some of the concerns that have been expressed by local
communities and organizations include:

“The creation of a National Monument by President
declaration does not allow for input from local
communities…; could result negative impacts… for
grazing, hunting, water development and forest
restoration…which would result in negative economic
and public health impacts to the City of Williams.”

"The Town Council of the Town of Fredonia is concerned
that the impact from the Grand Canyon Watershed
National Monument “on the Town and its citizens includes
but is not limited to: (a) the closing of three businesses…
(b) the impairment of small independent businesses…(c)
expected reduction or even extinction of local ranching
efforts…(d)
loss of recreation and tourism…”

“In closing, we believe the proposal is a clear attempt to by-
pass the ongoing planning and management efforts that
serve wildlife, wildlife habitat, and the public well with the
intent of satisfying a few special interest groups.”

“This proposed designation would almost double the
amount of acreage designated as national monuments in
Arizona and would be the nation's second largest national
monument…the proposed monument designation would
severely impact thousands of acres of state trust lands
locked up within its boundaries and deny their beneficial
use to the trust…”

Background

The federal government’s ability to set aside land for
monuments and national parks comes from the
Antiquities Act of 1906, which was originally intended to
protect prehistoric Indian ruins and artifacts on federal
lands in the West. More than one hundred years later, the
original purpose of this bill has been significantly abused;
more than 130 million acres and more than 100 national
monuments now exist. President Obama has used the
Antiquities Act 16 times now, limiting public input and
bypassing Congress each time.

President Obama has created or expanded 16 national
monuments during his tenure.

The Gosar-Hardy amendment prohibits pending
Presidential designations of a National Monument in
specified counties including Mohave and
Coconino in
Arizona; Modoe and Siskiyou in California; Chaffee, Moffat,
and Park in Colorado; Lincoln, Clark and Nye in Nevada;
Otero in New Mexico; Jackson, Josephine and Malheur in
Oregon; Wayne, Garfield and Kane in Utah.

Earlier this year, three Democrats from Arizona’s
delegation sent a letter to the President asking him to
unilaterally designate 1.7 million acres in the Grand
Canyon Watershed as a National Monument.

Arizona already has 18 national monuments, more than
any other state. Nearly 50 percent of all land in Arizona is
already under federal management and ‘more than 77
percent of Arizona’s lands are restricted from public
access and recreation...’

In February, Congressman Gosar spearheaded an effort
in opposition to this land grab and demanded that
President Obama not use the Antiquities Act to designate
the Grand Canyon Watershed as a National Monument. 24
different members in the House as well as Senators
McCain and Flake joined Rep. Gosar in opposing this
potential designation at that time. More info can be found
HERE.

The Gosar-Hardy amendment had significant support
from organizations and citizens throughout the country
including: American Farm Bureau, Public Lands Council,
National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Motorcycle
Industry Council (MIC), Specialty Vehicle Institute of
America (SVIA), Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle
Association (ROHVA), Americans for Responsible
Recreation Access (ARRA), Eagle Forum, Arizona
Cattleman’s Association, Arizona Farm Bureau, Arizona
Cattle Growers’ Association, Arizona Cattle Feeders'
Association, the Arizona Mining Association, the Colorado
Cattlemen’s Association, Colorado Off Highway Vehicle
Association, the Colorado Snowmobile Association, the
Trails Preservation Alliance, Colorado Wool Growers
Association, Arizona Rock Products, Council for Citizens
Against Government Waste, Americans for Limited
Government, Coconino County Farm Bureau and Cattle
Growers Association, Yavapai Cattle Growers Association,
Navajo/Apache Cattle Growers Association, Greenlee
Cattle Growers Association, La Paz Stockmen’s
Association, Mohave Livestock Association, Gila County
Cattle Growers Association, Maricopa County Cattle
Growers Association, Cochise /Graham Cattle Growers
Association, Southern Arizona Cattlemen's Protective
Association, the Yavapai County Board of Supervisors, La
Paz County Supervisor King Clapperton, City of Williams,
Mohave Sportsman Club, Town of Fredonia, Arizona
Sportsmen for Wildlife Conservation, Anglers United, AZ
Antelope Foundation, AZ BASS Nation, AZ Big Game
Super Raffle, AZ Bowhunters Association, AZ Chapter of
Safari Club International, AZ Deer Association, AZ Desert
Bighorn Sheep Society, AZ Elk Society, AZ Houndsmen
Association, AZ Outdoor Sports, Coconino Sportsmen,
Outdoor Experience 4 All, South Eastern AZ Sportsmen’s
Club, SRT Outdoors, The BASS Federation, Xtreme
Predator Callers, 1.2.3.Go…
Bob Thorpe's Arizona National Monument bill SIGNED into LAW
Go
HERE for details